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New Nighttime Tours at the Roman Forum
Published on Sunday, June 5, 2016 by A new feature will allow the public to see the Roman Forum in a new light this summer – literally, as the Forum will be illuminated by LEDs and open for nighttime tours for the first time. The lights cast white and yellow highlights onto the site’s most famous structures, drawing attention to details on parts of the Forum including the via Sacra, the monument...
Rome Bans Centurion Impersonators
Published on Sunday, December 6, 2015 by As Rome prepares for a Jubilee Year (otherwise known as a Catholic Holy Year), city authorities have banned actors who dress up as ancient centurion guards and charge tourists for photo opportunities of and with them. According to Reuters, new and extended security measures for the Jubilee include making sure visitors to the capital are not subjected to the centur...
Imperial Ramp Opens in Rome
Published on Wednesday, November 18, 2015 by Proving there’s always something new to discover among Rome’s ancient treasures, the Roman Forum recently opened a newly restored section to the public for the first time. The Imperial Ramp, a more than 2,000-year-old pathway connecting the public part of the Forum to emperors’ private residences, offers a new look at how the rich and famous lived in ancient Rom...
Remains of Arch of Titus Discovered in Rome
Published on Monday, June 29, 2015 by Back in 81 AD, the Roman Emperor would have entered the Circus Maximus in grand style, standing in a chariot steered through the newly constructed Arch of Titus. But until recently, the only records of that structure existed in medieval-era documents; stone that wasn’t pilfered sank beneath the ground and was lost for eight centuries. However, this spring archaeo...
Gladiator School in Rome To Be Restored
Published on Friday, June 12, 2015 by Rome’s gladiator barracks, part of the city’s famous Colosseum, may soon be accessible to the public—thanks, in part, to the Kuwaiti government. An ancient tunnel linking those training chambers to the main arena could be restored with funds from a multi-million dollar grant from Kuwait, writes The Telegraph. The Ludus Magnus (Great Training Facility) was the...
Baths of Diocletian Reopen in Rome
Published on Monday, September 29, 2014 by To commemorate 2,000 years since the death of Rome’s first emperor, Augustus, in 14 AD, the ancient Baths of Diocletian reopened to the public last week in Rome. Visitors can view the natation (outdoor swimming pool) and the small cloister of the Basilica di Santa Maria degli Angeli, which was built in the 16th century on the ruins of the baths. Marble sculptures...
Ostia Antica Discovery: “Bigger Than Pompeii”
Published on Monday, April 21, 2014 by While Pompeii may be the most famous archaeological site in Italy, fans of Ancient Rome often argue that the lesser-known ruins of Ostia Antica, just outside of Rome, surpass Pompeii in quality. Now there's even more reason to get your archaeological fix at this old port town with a secret part of the ancient site recently unearthed. "The find is enormous, inclu...
Vatican Opens Ancient Necropolis to Public
Published on Monday, February 3, 2014 by Today the Vatican opened the Roman Necropolis of the Via Triumphalis to the public for the first time. The ancient burial ground dates back to the first century B.C. when it was the place of final rest for local Romans. The 10,000-square-foot site was originally uncovered during the 1950s during construction of a new parking garage underneath the Vatican. ...
Site Where Julius Caesar Was Stabbed Has Been ID’ed in Rome
Published on Friday, October 12, 2012 by There were few moments more dramatic in ancient Rome than the stabbing of Emperor Julius Caesar; but until now the details have been murky. Archaeologists from the Spanish National Research Council say they have now pinpointed the location and details of the famous act. According to the Huffington Post, "The scientists said in a written statement that they found a ...
Rome Colosseum to Undergo Extensive Repairs
Published on Wednesday, August 15, 2012 by While Pisa was thought to have cornered the market on Italy’s most famous “leaning” building, Rome appears to be taking a page from the Pisa playbook as scientists say Rome’s Colosseum is leaning to one side by as much as  15 inches. Officials announced this month that the Colosseum will undergo 2.5 years of repairs starting in December 2012.   The good n...